Doctor listening to patient's heart with stethoscope

Cardiac Care

Donate today

For more firsts in

Doctor listening to patient's heart with stethoscope

For more firsts in

Cardiac Care

Donate today

Your donations give the gift that keeps on beating.

Every 20 minutes, someone in Canada dies from cardiac issues. In the treatment of major heart issues, every minute matters.

With your help, we’re funding lifesaving healthcare innovations. Like minimally invasive cardiac procedures for thousands of heart patients.

Your support means better heart health for everyone.

Did you know?

 

Every 20 minutes, someone in Canada dies from cardiac issues.

6,529 Catheterization Laboratory (Cath Lab) procedures are completed at Foothills Medical Centre every year. That’s 17 per day!

9 in 10 Canadians over 20 have at least one risk factor for heart conditions, stroke, or vascular cognitive impairment.

Heart disease and stroke is the #1 cause of premature death in women in Canada.

You can have an impact on patients who face heart disease.

Read these inspiring patient stories, highlighting how crucial it is to receive timely and quality medical care when time is of the essence.

Fayez Shlah has always found joy on the soccer field, fueled by his passion for the game. However, when he collapsed while playing at just 41 years old, his life took a drastic turn. After undergoing a series of medical examinations, it was discovered that he had a blockage in his aorta that required a stent insertion surgery. This event marked the start of his challenging journey of dealing with cardiac issues.

When a slipped disc put Mark Shupe’s next marathon on hold, he made a new audacious goal: walk every street in Calgary. Then, an unexpected heart attack put Mark’s plans on hold again. But Mark’s perseverance means he has one clear finish line in mind, and he is crossing it to pay it forward. Mark made a plan to walk every street in Calgary, no matter his setbacks. 

Shirley was born with a double aortic arch and a narrowing or constriction, known as coarctation. In her case, that meant her heart was sending more blood to her brain, rather than to her extremities. It was a condition that many children did not survive. With all of Shirley’s adversities, she realized the gift she was given.

Let’s create more firsts in Cardiac Care, together.